EUSAR 2020 Banner Transfer
(c) M. Weiß
2020-08-06 event information

Program and Speakers

We are pleased to announce our Keynote and Invited Speakers

Keynotes of EUSAR 2022 - July 26, 2022

Wolfgang Schleich

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schleich

Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm

Hagler Institute for Advanced Study, Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE), Texas A&M University

A brief introduction into quantum technologies

Wolfgang Schleich

Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm

Hagler Institute for Advanced Study, Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE), Texas A&M University

A brief introduction into quantum technologies

Abstract

We provide a brief introduction into quantum technologies such as quantum computing, quantum sensing, quantum communication as well as quantum radar. In order to lay the ground work for these topics we also summarize the key features of quantum theory.

Wolfgang P. Schleich is engaged in research on quantum optics ranging from the foundations of quantum physics via tests of general relativity with light and cold atoms to number theory. He was educated at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich and studied with Marlan O. Scully at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, and the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Garching. Moreover, he was also a post doctoral fellow with John Archibald Wheeler at the University of Texas at Austin.
Professor Schleich is a member of several national and international academies and has received numerous prizes and honors for his scientific work such as the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize, the Max Planck Research Award, and the Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics, and the Herbert-Walther Prize. He is also a Faculty Fellow at the Hagler Institute for Advanced Study at Texas A&M University. His textbook, Quantum Optics in Phase Space, has been translated into Russian and a Chinese edition was published in 2010.

Scott Hensley

Dr. Scott Hensley

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, USA

Historical and Future Radar Observations of Venus

Scott Hensley

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, USA

Historical and Future Radar Observations of Venus

Abstract
If ever a planet was suited for radar remote sensing observations, it would be Venus. Shrouded in an optically thick atmosphere, and with conditions at the surface inhospitable to in situ investigations, radar observations of Venus are integral to unraveling Venus’ secrets. Earth- and orbital-based radar observations of Venus began in the 1960s, giving a first glimpse of how extremely divergent Venus was from the Earth. From its inexplicably low and retrograde rotation rate, to temperature and pressure conditions at the surface hotter than the surface of Mercury and equivalent to being 1 km deep in the ocean, Venus was full of surprises. How Venus and Earth could have formed so differently is perhaps one of the most fundamental questions associated with understanding habitability of rocky planets. Deep understanding of planetary habitability requires identifying key factors that govern the surface environment over time. Plate tectonics on Earth is vital to its habitability, linking the atmosphere, surface and interior through its influence on the geology, continents, volcanism and volatile cycles. Venus lacks Earth-like plate tectonics but shows hints of subduction a possible precursor to plate tectonics and Venus today offers the opportunity to observe the processes that form subduction, absent plate tectonics. Similarly, the nature of volcanism on Venus, whether it is episodic or in steady state like Earth, and its role in the planet’s evolution, is still poorly understood. Two new missions to Venus, VERITAS by NASA and EnVision by ESA would bring modern radar interferometric and polarimetric measurements to Venus in the 2030s to answer these fundamental questions. VERITAS, planned for launch in 2027, carries a two-aperture X-band synthetic aperture radar interferometer to acquire global imagery and topography of the surface. EnVision, planned for launch in 2031, carries among its instrument suite a dual polarization S-band synthetic aperture radar that will acquire targeted SAR imagery of the surface, as well as nearly global altimetry and microwave surface emissivity when operating in its altimeter and radiometer modes. 

This talk will describe how past radar observations of Venus have informed our understanding of the planet and how these planned new radar observations will extend our knowledge of Venus and rocky planet evolution in general. 

Scott Hensley received his BS degrees in Mathematics and Physics from the University of California at Irvine and the Ph.D. in Mathematics from Stony Brook University where he specialized in the study of differential geometry. In 1991, Dr. Hensley joined the staff of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he is currently a Senior Research Scientist studying advanced radar techniques for geophysical applications. He has worked on the Magellan and Cassini radars, was the Chief Scientist of GeoSAR, an airborne X and P-band single pass interferometric radar, led the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Interferometric Processor Development Team, and was Principal Investigator and is currently the Project Scientist for the NASA UAVSAR L-band airborne radar. He is the Project Scientist for the recently selected NASA VERITAS and ESA EnVision missions to Venus. He is an IEEE Fellow and recipient of numerous NASA individual and group achievement awards.

Tutorials on July 25, 2022

Tutorial 1: Multidimensional SAR & MTI Techniques

09:00 - **SAR Interferometry: an Introduction**  (Alessandro Ferretti / TRE ALTAMIRA, Italy)

10:30 - Coffee Break

11:00 - **SAR Tomography and Multi-Dimensional Imaging**  (Gianfranco Fornaro & Simona Verde / IREA-CNR, Italy)

12:30 - Lunch

13:45 - **GMTI with multi-channel SAR**  (Joachim Ender / Fraunhofer FHR, Germany)

15:15 - Coffee Break

15:45 - **Circular SAR imagery and applications**  (Hélène Oriot / ONERA, France)

17:15 - End of Tutorial

Tutorial 2: Spatial Diversity Imaging Systems & Polarmetric SAR

09:00 - **Distributed SAR/ISAR**  (Pierfrancesco Lombardo & Debora Pastina / Uni. Sapienza Roma, Italy)

10:30 Coffee Break

11:00 - **Experimental Aspects of distributed SAR/ISAR Systems**  (Patrick Berens & Risto Vehmas / Fraunhofer FHR, Germany & ICEYE, Finland)

12:30 - Lunch

13:45 - **SAR Polarimetry**  (Laurent Ferro-Famil / Rennes, France)

15:15 - Coffee Break

15:45 - **Polarimetric Calibration and Application**  (Laurent Ferro-Famil / Univ. Rennes, France)

17:45 - End of Tutorial

**Industrial Tutorial:** Getting faster to meaningful Information

13:45 - Welcome Notes (Dr. Emlyn Hagen / L3Harris)

14:00 - Timely and high quality VHR SAR data for a fast changing world (Jürgen Schwarz / Capella Space)

15:15 - Coffee Break

15:45 - SAR based Simulation and Object Identification with Deep Learning (Andrey Giardino / sarmap)

16:15 - New features in latest SARscape to address challenging problems (Andrey Giardino / sarmap & Nicolai Holzer / L3Harris)

16:45 - Ready-to-use SAR workflows to derive information from data (Nicolai Holzer & Dr. Emlyn Hagen / L3Harris)

17:15 - Summary & Discussion

17:30 - End of Tutorial

Co-Organizers